The Canadian National No. 5

by John MacFarlane 2015

CN No. 5

Canadian National No. 5 (Photo from the John MacFarlane collection. )

The Canadian National No. 5 was built in 1930 by Prince Rupert Dry Dock & Shipyards Co. (hull #31) with the dimensions 67.3’ x 17.3’ x 8.8’ A Steel–hulled vessel of 68gt 15hp engine. Later in 1930 she was assembled at Kelowna BC.

CN No. 5

Canadian National No. 5 (Photo from the John MacFarlane collection. )

In 1930–1960 she was owned by Canadian Northern Steamships Ltd., Toronto ON. In 1961–1966 she was owned by Canadian National Railway Company, Montreal QC. In 1966–1973 she was owned by the Lawrence Equipment Co. Ltd., Nanaimo BC. She was laid up in 1973 while she was owned by Standard Enterprises Ltd., Vancouver BC. In 1975–1987 she was owned by Joseph C. Wilson, Langley BC. In 1987–1990 she was owned by Harold Lennox, Powell River BC.

CN No. 5

Mast Winch Canadian National No. 5 (Photo from the John MacFarlane collection. )

In 1966 she was carried out to the Pacific coast (and salt water) on railway flat cars.

CN No. 5

Canadian National No. 5 (Photo from the John MacFarlane collection. )

On February 11th, 1990 she was tragically lost in a snow storm in Georgia Strait. The four crew members were lost.

CN No. 5

View of the bridge of Canadian National No. 5 (Photo from the John MacFarlane collection. )

William Audette (a member of the British Columbia Nautical History Facebook Group) recalled that "It was on it’s way to Bellingham WA with a load of dogfish. It was snowing and the radar wasn’t working and she got caught between a tug and tow." Lonnie Edward Berrow (also member of the British Columbia Nautical History Facebook Group) recalled that "She sank in a storm, while loaded with fish, I think a guy from Surrey owned it who was friends with my grandfather.The boat came from an interior lake, it was cut in two and transported to the coast then welded back together again. I remember my grandfather speculating that the boat may have sprung a leak or split open as a result of the iron hull being welded together. Whatever happened, it was quick, and she went down fast with all aboard in southern Georgia Straits."


To quote from this article please cite:

MacFarlane, John M. (2015) Canadian National No. 5 Nauticapedia.ca 2015. http://nauticapedia.ca/Articles/CN_Number5.php

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