The Sailing Ship Pamir

by John MacFarlane 2017

Pamir

The Pamir (Photo courtesy of the MMBC. )

In 1905 she was built by Blohm & Voss at Hamburg Germany by Blohm & Voss. She was 114.5m x 14m x 7.25m (316' x 46' x 27') steel hull 2796gt. In 1951 she was rebuilt in West Germany, modernized with refurbished quarters to accommodate merchant marine trainees, fitted with an auxiliary engine, a refrigeration system for the galleys (precluding the need to carry live animals for fresh meat), modern communications equipment and water ballast tanks.

In 1905 she was owned by Ferdinand Laeisz, Germany in service in the nitrate trade. In 1920 she was acquired by the Kingdom of Italy as a war reparation. The Italian government was unable to find a deep–water sailing ship crew, so she was laid up near Castellamare in the Gulf of Naples. In 1924 she was owned by Ferdinand Laeisz, Germany in service in the nitrate trade. In 1931 she was owned by the Erikson Line, Finland in the Australian wheat trade. Seized as prize of war, 3 August 1941 in New Zealand. Ten commercial voyages were made under the New Zealand flag: five to San Francisco, three to Vancouver, one to Sydney and her last voyage across the Tasman from Sydney to Wellington carrying 2700 tons of cement and 400 tons of nail wire. After the war she made one voyage from Wellington via Cape Horn to London, then Antwerp to Auckland and Wellington in 1948. In 1948 she was owned by the Erikson Line, Finland. In 1951 she was owned by Heinz Schliewen, Germany.

Pamir

The Pamir (Photo courtesy of the MMBC. )

In 1951 she was rebuilt in West Germany, modernized with refurbished quarters to accommodate merchant marine trainees, fitted with an auxiliary engine, a refrigeration system for the galleys (precluding the need to carry live animals for fresh meat), modern communications equipment and water ballast tanks.

She called at Vancouver after the Second World War flying the New Zealand flag. In September 1957 she was lost in a storm in the North Atlantic.

She was built after steam engines had largely replaced sail as an economic mode of ship propulsion. She carried cargoes until the Second World War – calling at Esquimalt BC. In the Frst World War she was captured by the British from the Germans. In the Second World War she was captured by New Zealand from her Finnish owners. Sailing under New Zealand registry she called at Vancouver in 1945 and 1946. She was a storage hulk for barley in South Wales UK. In 1951 she was rebuilt in West Germany and became a sail training vessel for the merchant marine. In 1957 she sank in a hurricane 600 miles west of the Azores with only 6 survivors.



To quote from this article please cite:

MacFarlane, John M. (2017) The Sailing Ship Pamir. Nauticapedia.ca 2017. http://nauticapedia.ca/Gallery/Pamir.php

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